Reality Check

“The Fashion World” is the only place where a size 4 becomes plus size, a decision about shoes can make or break your career, and dressing in velvet leggings is socially acceptable! However, this global industry is far from just having a silent effect. The effect is blatantly shown by the media and in the popularity of current magazines. I can’t say I’ve never read one or haven’t flipped through them while standing in the grocery line. In fact, I love them! This brings me to the realization that the world of fashion and its followers might be in need of a reality check even if it is only for myself. If we all just took a moment to collect the $4.50 spent consistently on our obsession with fashion and celebrities we’d probably save a lot money over a lifetime and a lot of wasted time analyzing if the one shoulder dress is the way to go or maybe just the strapless with the sweetheart neck. Either way we buy into it, and we probably aren’t going to stop anytime soon! So why is it that this cultural phenomenon has become the obsession of so many teens and adults around the world? Good question, and I don’t know the exact answer. However, rather than answering the question, it might be best to figure out how to engage in a possible proper healthy relationship with this so-called media frenzy. I believe it is best to give myself and fellow fashion followers a needed reality check or should I say chic(okay, so it’s a bad a joke).

Anyhow, clothes were originally worn to bring covering to the body and for warmth, but I haven’t read anything that states that clothes were originally only for high-class fashionistas or the 10 best and worst dressed list.  Also, we need to remember that fashion is an expression of our personal style.  It’s not like the industry is curing cancer or solving world hunger. Of course, we all want to look our best. It’s a natural instinct; however, when we start trying to look our best just to impress others or because it’s what the “magazines” say is cool we’ve completely lost ourselves.  When all is said and done I think it’s best we step away from the magazine rack, take a deep breath in, and remember CLOTHES are really just CLOTHES!

One thought on “Reality Check”

  1. I’d put forth that all forms of clothing, going back to primitive, neolithic man (and indeed creatures not technically “man” at all such as Neanderthal), that evidence suggests “clothing” has always had a certain status-symbol quality to it. If not traditional clothing (such as shirt and pants), then clearly decorative items such as jewelry, beads, etc.

    My guess is that man has always been an accessorizer. It’s probably connected to our ingenuity and has helped fuel the development of our tools and other technological achievements.

    There just seems to be a common theme of attempting to “improve” ourselves by any means possible in both our determined technological advancement and our use of cloths and other accessories to “improve” ourselves.

    We are also clearly a visually stimulated species. Much more so than, say, a smell or hearing related species. That’s not really our specialization. We see, interpret, and respond.

    The use of “colors” and other elaborate designs actually goes well past mammals and deep into more primitive life forms – namely reptiles. We see this on display in the modern world most notably in birds (think of Peacocks, for example). Many scientists suspect that dinosaurs may have been much more richly colored than we originally thought (i.e., instead of the drab, dull, greenish-gray T-Rex, imagine a radiant red or red-orange one?).

    Anyhow – just goes to show that this may be something absolutely hard wired into some of our most basic behavior response patterns. So basic that it’s communicative effect is almost subconscious. Think about it – think of base emotions like attraction and fear and how near instantaneous they are in response to the associated stimuli.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Welcome to the blogosphere, by the way. I’m a horse racing blogger if you ever get into that.

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